Printmaking

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  • Printmaking is putting pigment from one surface on to another.
  • Printmaking is often about making multiples.
  • Printmaking can be the art of the unexpected!  There are many surprises when you print.
  • Printmaking can be the art of second chances: you can print and print again until you get the results you want.

Beginning Printmaking for Centers:

Students are encouraged to experiment with various sorts of paper:

  • Heavy white paper
  • Colored paper
  • Tissue paper
  • Wrapping paper
  • Discarded art work
  • Newspaper

Stamping:

  • Simple rubber stamps
  • Watercolor markers
  • Stamp pads

The raised part of the rubber stamp can be colored with watercolor markers or by using a stamp pad.  Students can stamp on other artwork or make designs entirely of stamped shapes.  Attention to pattern, repetition, overlapping, symmetry/assymmetry and varying the amount of pigment leads to interesting stamped prints.

Monoprints:

Monoprints create one copy that is reversed. It is important to work quickly so that pigment stays wet.

1. Folded paper: thick tempera paint on one side of a folded paper, fold quickly.  Add one color at a time, then fold, to build up a complex design.
2. Tempera on Plexiglas: Paint with thick tempera on Plexiglas  or other smooth surface.  Alter by scratching with sticks or sponging some areas. Print quickly before the paint dries.
3. Fingerpaint on Plexiglas: students should keep one hand clean for applying and rubbing the paper.
4. Monoprints with block print ink: apply smooth layer of ink  on Plexiglas using brayer. Scratch with various tools before printing.
5. Dry monoprints lend themselves to reworking.  Colored pencil and oil pastel can invigorate a dry print.  Trimming and using for collage works well also.

Stencils:

Students fold tag board scraps before cutting a simple shape.  Stencils can be printed using sponged paint, “bingo” markers or wiped chalk.  Attention to positive and negative space, pattern, repetition, symmetry/asymmetry makes for effective stenciled designs.

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